Sans forensics for500

Official website of Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. All organizations must prepare for cyber-crime occurring on their computer systems and within their networks.

Demand has never been greater for analysts who can investigate crimes such as fraud, insider threats, industrial espionage, employee misuse, and computer intrusions. Government agencies increasingly require trained media exploitation specialists to recover vital intelligence from Windows systems.

To help solve these cases, SANS is training a new cadre of the world's best digital forensic professionals, incident responders, and media exploitation experts capable of piecing together what happened on computer systems second by second. You can't protect what you don't know about, and understanding forensic capabilities and artifacts is a core component of information security. You will be able to use your new skills to validate security tools, enhance vulnerability assessments, identify insider threats, track hackers, and improve security policies.

Whether you know it or not, Windows is silently recording an unbelievable amount of data about you and your users. FOR teaches you how to mine this mountain of data. Proper analysis requires real data for students to examine. Students leave the course armed with the latest tools and techniques and prepared to investigate even the most complicated systems they might encounter. Nothing is left out - attendees learn to analyze everything from legacy Windows 7 systems to just-discovered Windows 10 artifacts.

FOR is continually updated. The course starts with an intellectual property theft and corporate espionage case that took over six months to create. You work in the real world, so your training should include real-world practice data. Our instructor development team used incidents from their own investigations and experiences to create an incredibly rich and detailed scenario designed to immerse students in an actual investigation.

The case demonstrates the latest artifacts and technologies an investigator might encounter while analyzing Windows systems. The detailed workbook shows step-by-step the tools and techniques that each investigator should employ to solve a forensic case.

Online, Instructor-Led. Online, Self-Paced. Framework Connections. Digital Forensics. Cyber Investigation.It was an informative and enjoyable class that culminated in another GIAC certification exam, which I passed this morning. But I was pleased to find that SANS London — and more specifically FOR Windows Forensic Analysis — followed roughly the same format that I was used to: eight hours of taking in as much information as possible in the classroom followed by some interesting talks and the NetWars capture the flag competition in the evenings.

sans forensics for500

The six-day programme took students through the fundamentals of Windows forensic analysis — that is, how to figure out what somebody was doing on their computer after the fact — against the backdrop of a fictional investigation into a former employee suspected of plotting against his company and misusing its intellectual property. Along the way, this touched upon imaging and memory acquisition, recovering deleted files, determining which applications were run, reviewing event logs, recovering email and instant messaging evidence, analysing browsing data, and much more — in many cases explaining how to find and parse this data even if efforts have been made to remove it.

Really, much of this course could have been presented as a rather long list of forensic artefacts and which registry keys they can be found in, but as always the SANS instructors in my case Lee Whitfield and David Cowen did a great job of bringing the content to life with some fascinating demos and stories from the field. However, the final day of the course involved no teaching and students were given a scenario to investigate and set loose on a forensic image — a perfect chance to scratch that itch and get some hands-on experience while the instructors were still around to answer questions.

At the end of the session each group presented its findings back to the class and students voted on which best answered the questions set out in the scenario. My team were the winners and I took home a coveted SANS Lethal Forensicator coin our class team also came second in NetWars the night before, so we were really quite a successful group! I booked my test for a month later at an examination centre in London and spent the time between building my index and completing the practice exams on the GIAC website.SANS renumbered the course to better reflect the course's intermediate-level material.

The content of the course will remain basically the same, although it will be constantly updated to reflect changes in the field. Why change the course number? This class does not include basic digital forensic analysis concepts. The course has been at the intermediate skill level since and a course number change to the 5 level reflects this content more accurately.

The course is vigorously updated each year. The change in the course number was timed to coincide with the regularly scheduled update of the course in the Spring of SANS courses are updated as frequently as possible as part of our efforts to keep teaching material hyper-current and relevant for leading-edge problem solving. FOR focuses on deep-dive forensic analysis of Windows operating systems and artifact locations.

FOR teaches students how to conduct enterprise incident response and threat hunting.

sans forensics for500

Its focus is on intrusion response and forensics. Each course complements the other and both should be taken to create a full operational and analytical capability. How does the change in the course number affect GIAC certification? Any current GCFE certifications will not change in any way. How will the course number change affect alumni?

If you have any additional questions regarding this change, please email us at FOR sans. Related Content. Digital Forensics and Incident Response. October 18, I like Windows.

I said it.With the wealth of data stored on Windows computers it is often difficult to know where to start. EZ Tools enables you to provide scriptable, scalable, and repeatable results with astonishing speed and accuracy.

Go from one investigation a week to several per day. This type of performance is common with the command-line versions of EZ Tools, and this poster will show you how to use them. Download Here. The first side "Find Evil - Know Normal" focuses on what's normal on a Windows host helps cut through the noise to quickly locate potential malware.

My Take on Preparing for GIAC Certification Exams

Use the information on the first side as a reference to know what's normal in Windows and to focus your attention on the outliers.

The second side is the "Hunt Evil: Lateral Movement" During incident response and threat hunting, it is critical to understand how attackers move around your network.

Lateral movement is an inescapable requirement for attackers to stealthily move from system to system and accomplish their objectives. Every adversary, including the most skilled, will use some form of lateral movement technique described here during a breach.

Understanding lateral movement tools and techniques allows responders to hunt more efficiently, quickly perform incident response scoping, and better anticipate future attacker activity. Network Forensic Poster - Network communications are a critical component to most forensic casework and threat hunting operations.

Community: Posters

This poster helps bring clarity to the types and sources of network-based evidence, how to convert full-packet data to other, more rapidly examined formats, the tools used to query that evidence, and general use cases for network data in typical DFIR operations. Threat Intelligence Consumption Poster - Cyber Threat Intelligence is a wide and specialized field that goes far beyond indicators and threat feeds.

Empower your organization to generate and consume threat intelligence to counter the adversary. This poster provides a reference to getting started with these freely available toolkits, so you can create your own ultimate forensication machine. Advanced attackers are increasingly operating completely in memory and NOT writing files to disk. Running tools against your memory dumps gives you data, but what does that data mean?!

The SANS memory forensics poster offers analysts a jumping off point for analyzing incidents using our intuitive six-step analysis process. It provides a layout of the most important structures in Windows kernel memory, which are critical for piecing together advanced analysis tasks.

Finally, the poster highlights a variety of advancements in Windows kernel protections that have fundamentally changed the way analysts must perform memory forensics. Smartphones are the most personal computing device associated to any user, and can therefore provide the most relevant data per gigabyte examined.

SANS FOR500: I’m now a GIAC Certified Forensic Examiner

Commercial tools often miss digital evidence on smartphones and associated applications, and improper handling can render the data useless. Use this poster as a cheat-sheet to help you remember how to handle smartphones, where to obtain actionable intelligence, and how to recover and analyze data on the latest smartphones and tablets. DFIR "Evidence of By using the techniques in this Poster's chart, you will learn how to narrow the thousands of files on a typical machine down to the files that are possible malware.

This process of "malware funneling" is key to your quick and efficient analysis of compromised hosts.This is by far the best training I have ever had. My forensic knowledge increased more in the last 5 days than in the last year. The most up-to-date training I have received. All organizations must prepare for cyber-crime occurring on their computer systems and within their networks. Demand has never been greater for analysts who can investigate crimes such as fraud, insider threats, industrial espionage, employee misuse, and computer intrusions.

Government agencies increasingly require trained media exploitation specialists to recover vital intelligence from Windows systems. To help solve these cases, SANS is training a new cadre of the world's best digital forensic professionals, incident responders, and media exploitation experts capable of piecing together what happened on computer systems second by second.

You can't protect what you don't know about, and understanding forensic capabilities and artifacts is a core component of information security. You will be able to use your new skills to validate security tools, enhance vulnerability assessments, identify insider threats, track hackers, and improve security policies. Whether you know it or not, Windows is silently recording an unbelievable amount of data about you and your users. FOR teaches you how to mine this mountain of data.

sans forensics for500

Proper analysis requires real data for students to examine. Students leave the course armed with the latest tools and techniques and prepared to investigate even the most complicated systems they might encounter.

Nothing is left out - attendees learn to analyze everything from legacy Windows 7 systems to just-discovered Windows 10 artifacts. FOR is continually updated. The course starts with an intellectual property theft and corporate espionage case that took over six months to create.

You work in the real world, so your training should include real-world practice data. Our instructor development team used incidents from their own investigations and experiences to create an incredibly rich and detailed scenario designed to immerse students in an actual investigation. The case demonstrates the latest artifacts and technologies an investigator might encounter while analyzing Windows systems. The detailed workbook shows step-by-step the tools and techniques that each investigator should employ to solve a forensic case.

Notice: Please plan to arrive 30 minutes early on Day 1 for lab preparation and set-up. The Windows Forensic Analysis course starts with an examination of digital forensics in today's interconnected environments and discusses challenges associated with mobile devices, tablets, cloud storage, and modern Windows operating systems. Hard drive sizes are increasingly difficult to handle appropriately in digital cases. Being able to acquire data in an efficient and forensically sound manner is crucial to every investigator today.

Most fundamental analysts can easily image a hard drive using a write blocker. In this course, we will review the core techniques while introducing new triage-based acquisition and extraction capabilities that will increase the speed and efficiency of the acquisition process.

We will demonstrate how to acquire memory, the NTFS MFT, Windows logs, Registry, and critical files that will take minutes to acquire instead of the hours or days currently spent on acquisition. We will also begin processing our collected evidence using stream-based and file-carving-based extraction capabilities that employ both commercial and open-source tools and techniques.

Seasoned investigators will need to know how to target the specific data that they need to begin to answer fundamental questions in their cases. Our journey continues with the Windows Registry, where the digital forensic investigator will learn how to discover critical user and system information pertinent to almost any investigation.

Each examiner will learn how to navigate and examine the Registry to obtain user profile data and system data. The course teaches forensic investigators how to prove that a specific user performed keyword searches, executed specific programs, opened and saved files, perused folders, and used removable devices.FOR, a new Digital Forensics Essentials course from SANS provides the necessary knowledge to understand the Digital Forensics and Incident Response disciplines, how to be an effective and efficient digital forensics practitioner or incident responder, and how to effectively use digital evidence.

FOR, a digital forensic acquisition training course, provides the necessary skills to identify the many and varied data storage mediums in use today, and how to collect and preserve this data in a forensically sound manner despite how and where it may be stored.

It covers digital acquisition from computers, portable devices, networks, and the cloud. It then teaches the student Battlefield Forensics, or the art and science of identifying and starting to extract actionable intelligence from a hard drive in 90 minutes or less.

FOR builds in-depth and comprehensive digital forensics knowledge of Microsoft Windows operating systems by analyzing and authenticating forensic data as well as track detailed user activity and organize findings.

Threat hunting and Incident response tactics and procedures have evolved rapidly over the past several years. Your team can no longer afford to use antiquated incident response and threat hunting techniques that fail to properly identify compromised systems. The key is to constantly look for attacks that get past security systems, and to catch intrusions in progress, rather than after attackers have completed their objectives and done worse damage to the organization.

Windows Forensics FOR500 (formerly FOR408) Rob Lee

For the incident responder, this process is known as "threat hunting". FOR teaches advanced skills to hunt, identify, counter, and recover from a wide range of threats within enterprise networks, including APT nation-state adversaries, organized crime syndicates, and hactivists. Times and trends change and forensic investigators and analysts need to change with them.

The new Mac and iOS Forensic Analysis and Incident Response course provides the tools and techniques necessary to take on any Mac case without hesitation. The intense hands-on forensic analysis skills taught in the course will enable Windows-based investigators to broaden their analysis capabilities and have the confidence and knowledge to comfortably analyze any Mac or iOS system.

Memory Forensics In-Depth provides the critical skills necessary for digital forensics examiners and incident responders to proficiently analyze captured memory images and live response audits. The course uses the most effective freeware and open-source tools in the industry today and provides an in-depth understanding of how these tools work. FOR is a critical course for any serious DFIR investigator who wants to tackle advanced forensics, trusted insider, and incident response cases.

sans forensics for500

SANS FOR, an advanced network forensics course covers the tools, technology, and processes required to integrate network evidence sources into your investigations, with a focus on efficiency and effectiveness.

Cyber threat intelligence represents a force multiplier for organizations looking to update their response and detection programs to deal with increasingly sophisticated advanced persistent threats.

Malware is an adversary's tool but the real threat is the human one, and cyber threat intelligence focuses on countering those flexible and persistent human threats with empowered and trained human defenders.

During a targeted attack, an organization needs a top-notch and cutting-edge threat hunting or incident response team armed with the threat intelligence necessary to understand how adversaries operate and to counter the threat. FOR Cyber Threat Intelligence will train you and your team in the tactical, operational, and strategic level cyber threat intelligence skills and tradecraft required to make security teams better, threat hunting more accurate, incident response more effective, and organizations more aware of the evolving threat landscape.They've mastered the concepts and skills, beat out their classmates, and proven their prowess.

Lethal Forensicator Coins are awarded to those who show exceptional talent, make outstanding contributions to the field, or demonstrate leadership in the digital forensics profession and community.

The coins are a challenge to win and an honor to receive. They are also intended to be rare. Challenges for the Coins are held on the final day of each course.

Students must successfully overcome several obstacles, directly compete against fellow students, and prove their proficiency during timed, hands-on incidents. The obstacles, competitions, and hands-on scenarios have been created by SANS's top instructors, who are digital forensics practitioners, subject-matter experts, experienced teachers, and industry leaders in their own right.

At the end of the challenge the instructor announces the winner s and awards them their coins. These analysts know what they are up against and continually strive to further not only their own knowledge, but also the knowledge of the entire digital forensics field. They are proactive in sharing their experience and encouraging learning through participation in the community. They stay ahead of the curve by constantly seeking new knowledge.

Often, they are the leaders in the digital forensics and incident response community. SANS Challenge Coins were initially created to recognize students who demonstrate exceptional talent, make outstanding contributions, or serve as leaders in the digital forensics profession and community. The coin is meant to be an honor, and it is intended to be rare. The SANS Institute uses the coins to identify and honor those who excel at detecting and eradicating threats, understand the critical importance of cybersecurity, and continually strive to further not only their own knowledge but also that of the entire digital forensics field.

They proactively share their experience and encourage learning through participation in the community, and they are typically leaders in the digital forensics and incident response community.

The original DFIR Lethal Forensicator coin has been retired with the release of the class-specific coins listed above. However, the holders of this coin are still as worthy of respect for their accomplishments. If you encounter a holder of this coin in the field, you've found an original. In that tongue-in-cheek podcast, Ovie and Brett described a tool called "Forensicator Pro" that would put forensic analysts out of business and was "viewed by many in the community as the end of human involvement in computer forensics examinations.

But to this day, Brett and Ovie still receive emails asking where "Forensicator Pro" can be purchased and downloaded! The term "forensicator" stuck and today is used by many computer forensics and incident response firms to describe individuals who essentially perform the same type of work as the mythical "Forensicator Pro" would have done.

The forensicator label has grown in popularity among digital forensic professionals in the workplace, at conferences, and while sharing a cold one with a friend.


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